REMEMBER THE TIME BLOG HOP

The Rebel Inside

This week’s challenge was to write about a time when you broke the rules. This post will be inspired by my very rebellious little sister, Ali.

DISCLAIMER: I do not ever advise breaking rules. All rules have a reason, so breaking them should also have a good reason. Not all situations will work out as well as this. But, they do always work, as long as if you are doing the wrong things for the right reason.

I’ve never really been much for rule-breaking. I followed the school dress code without too much question (though moving from Bedicheck to Lockhart was quite a change). I listened to my teachers. I never skipped class. I never snuck out late at night. I never threw a party without my parents’ permission (I never really threw parties at all). All that jazz. I never really felt a need to break rules, though when I did (and they were small rules, like watching TV for five more minutes when my mom told me to got to bed) always made me feel pretty darn cool.

My sister, Ali, on the other hand, likes to think she is a rebel. A few years ago she colored her hair. She loved her jeans with the holes in them even though they were against school policy. And she used her phone in school all the time. To be fair, I never had anyone I really wanted to talk to that couldn’t wait until after school. And I sometimes used my phone for nerdy school things: googling things that I didn’t know how to spell, making a to-do list, adding a reminder, checking the time, and occasionally at lunch for to catch up on the gossip. But I really didn’t do much with my phone during the day. Besides, some of my teachers (Mrs. Hitter mostly) wouldn’t tolerate phones in her class; and others kept us busy enough that we didn’t really have time to be playing with our phones.

Anyway. One day, in Mrs. Hitter’s class, we had the laptops (oh man, I hated those things; they were slow and the batteries were shotty at best and they took forever and a year to connect to the internet and they didn’t even work consistently; they were awful). This class was a blocked class, so we were in there second and third periods. Ali’s third period was next door, so some days she came by to visit. On this particular day, I left class for the four minute passing period and when I walked in, she was walking out. She gave me a very devious smile, hugged me and walked into her class.

I came back to this note on my laptop:

So, I, being a loving big sister, pulled my phone out of my pocket and took a picture. And of course Mrs. Hitter came over and asked me what I was doing with my phone out. And I think I had a mini heart attack because my parents always told me that if I got my phone taken away at school and they had to pay the $15 fee or whatever it was, I was not going to get it back. And as not addicted to my phone as I was, I didn’t want to lose it. That would be so sad.

So I showed her the note Ali left behind. And she did something I did not expect. She laughed. And then she told me to go ahead and take my picture and post it and then she didn’t wanna see my phone again. That was the best thing she could have told me. And I did.

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Ali, you inspire me every day and I wish I was willing to take risks as you are. I am so proud of the young lady you have become and I cannot wait to see all of the wonderful things you will do with your life. Keep on making us proud! Love you!

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